Tipsy Fish: When Anti-Anxiety Meds Get Into Rivers

Psychotropic drugs pass right through humans and into wastewater—and that's a problem for wildlife

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The modern pharmacopeia is a glorious thing—drugs have helped many people with depression and anxiety, not to mention cancer and other life-threatening diseases. But what goes down your throat must eventually come out, er, elsewhere—especially since drugs are designed specifically so they won’t break down on the pharmacy shelves or in a patient’s body. Starting in the 1990s, with the advent of super-sensitive chemical-detection technology, scientists began discovering that a lot of this medical chemistry is surviving wastewater treatment plants and flowing into waterways. That, in turn, raised a basic and troubling question: What’s it doing to the fish?

Typically, the impact of industrial chemistry on wildlife is tested using fairly basic measures of toxicity. If it doesn’t kill animals outright or prevent them from reproducing—as DDT did by causing birds to lay thin-shelled eggs—it’s not considered a clear and present threat. But with more and more psychotropic drugs like antidepressants and anti-anxiety drugs flowing from factories, into consumers and out into the wild, environmental scientists have begun to worry that the meds may be affecting animal behavior too. In a paper published this week in the journal Science, Swedish researchers report that they put that question to the test—and they came up with some troubling answers.

The scientists, all affiliated with Sweden’s Umeå University, began by testing perch, a species of schooling fish, living downstream from a wastewater treatment plant. The investigators were specifically looking for traces of the anti-anxiety drug oxazepam, which has been observed in waste water before. They found the drug in the water and, when they examined muscle samples of the fish, saw it there too—but in six times the concentration it is in the river, suggesting that it builds up in the animals’ bodies over time. Next, they started afresh with a school of perch they hatched from eggs and, when they had grown, put them through a battery of tests to measure behavioral qualities thought important for perch survival, such as schooling and danger avoidance. Then they split the school into three groups: the first would live in a tank with clean water, the second would swim in water with a same concentration of oxazepam on the order of what was found in the river, and the third would get water with 500 times the river’s concentration.

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Once the fish had been in their respective treatments for a week, the researchers ran the behavioral tests again. To see whether the fish sought the company of others, they released each perch into the central compartment of a three-part tank, which had three other perch on one side and an empty compartment on the other, and recorded where and how the central fish swam for about ten minutes. Then, to measure the fish’s boldness, they put each perch into a small, dark box for 5 minutes in another tank, opened a door in the box’s side, and watched to see how long it took the fish to venture out of its haven. Finally, they put each fish in a tank stocked with 20 zooplankton, the tiny creatures perch like to eat, and recorded how long it took them to snap up their prey.

The clean-water fish were unchanged after their time in their pristine tank, performing the same way as they had a week before. The fish exposed to a low level of oxazepam spent significantly less time near other fish, darted around more frequently, and gobbled up their food much more quickly than they had a week prior. The effects were even more pronounced in the high-exposure fish, particularly in the boldness test. Leaving the dark box requires more chutzpah than most perch can muster; not a single clean-water fish or low-dose oxazepam fish would do it. But a remarkable 23 of the 24 high-dose fish came out. “It’s an extreme effect,” says Tomas Brodin, assistant professor of ecology and an author of the paper. “They get fearless.” Brodin suspects that the low-dose fish’s more hyperactive, less social behavior is a milder version of the high-dose fish’s boldness, all implying a reduction of caution. “That’s bad, if you’re a little schooling fish,” he adds.

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The Umeå researchers do not suggest oxazepam or any psychotropic operates exactly the same way on fish that it does in humans. At the same time, the drug works through a particular cellular receptor that humans and perch—and many other species—share, so there is a potential for overlaps. That has Bryan Brooks, a professor of environmental science at Baylor University with long experience studying pharmaceuticals in the environment, arguing for a new testing standard for drug toxicity. “We should be thinking about behavior in a compound that affects behavior,” he says.

If groups like the US Environmental Protection Agency are ever to draft regulations to improve the control of drug release into the environment, they will need just that kind of testing data to determine which drugs need the most attention and how to get rid of them. That could lead to demand for new filtering technologies—and those systems could be put straight to work. “The good thing is that we have the effluent in the pipe,” says environmental scientist Jerker Fick, another author of the paper. “If someone comes up with a good solution to remove [the drugs], we have a place for it.”

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56 comments
ajcampagna
ajcampagna

@TIME re:meds in waterway, the fish don't panic when they bite the hook OR they float around like Dori in Nemo lol

HandmadeDiva
HandmadeDiva

@TIME This is a VERY INTERESTING article. Our planet is so polluted in so many ways. How will life on Earth survive???

computekdirect
computekdirect

If it is in the water supply, is it possible that the drugs re negatively impacting humans as well? The increase in violence and strange unexplained behaviors in recent years???

glimandri
glimandri

@TIME : They swim sideways ? Wait I have a better one "They go with the flow!"

byrondelaney
byrondelaney

1984. And all you prescription druggies are the 1984 weirdos while I and the others will escape! 

Bob65536
Bob65536

Another problem is the large amount of antibacterial chemicals leaving waste water treatment plants. This causes resistant bacteria to evolve.

judyreagan
judyreagan

@TIME They don't worry about the 1 in 5 extinction threat?

bennyc50
bennyc50

@CurseOfBenitez All the catfish in the mud gettin tipsy

Nixie
Nixie

“@TIME: What happens to fish when anti-anxiety drugs end up waterways? | http://t.co/hHEn7xc5” decidedly less stressed re: being eaten

2jeffwilliams
2jeffwilliams

Nope.Don't take any of it.Just an occasional Motrin if my shoulder fires up.

thenitenurse
thenitenurse

I for years thought it was okay to dump old medications down the toilet because I thought it was recycled through the water treatment plants but obviously it isn't. There are several programs in bigger cities that will take back old or unwanted medications.

BarryChute
BarryChute

@TIME So I've been sedating fish for years? OMG, I feel a panic attack coming!

itsAKmane
itsAKmane

@TIME typos all day...4.2M followers...

Echorenovate
Echorenovate

“@TIME: What happens to fish when anti-anxiety drugs end up waterways? | http://t.co/AKiP3GIG” << They get bizarrely fearless :-/ #behappy

Rhonda_Sherwood
Rhonda_Sherwood

@TIME wow that is upsetting that medication are affecting wildlife

lorabruncke
lorabruncke

@TIME PS I bet it will come out that drugs and #vaccines DO NOT HELP HUMAN HEALTH in the long run. We should have stuck with #cannabis.

lorabruncke
lorabruncke

@TIME We will get sick/stupid and our children will have to look after us if they are not too sick/stupid. Our children will be STERILE!

smugly_snug
smugly_snug

@TIME They learn to accept their fate and not fight it?

lynaecook
lynaecook

Whoa yes but what? cc @ReefCheck RT @TIME: What happens to fish when anti-anxiety drugs end up waterways? | http://t.co/ojVpkm08

DrAlexFord
DrAlexFord

@djhutch @ourocean @time our special edition on antidepressants in aquatic environment will be published in Aquatic Toxicology later this yr

EnderLyon
EnderLyon

The responses here are amazing, do you really think your exempt from all of this? Low levels of virtually every drug we make are starting to show up in the water supplies and our food, at least we won't be depressed about it!


JohnCarrasco
JohnCarrasco

wow!  That explains the appearance of the trout I caught the other day;  it had a huge nut sack and a beard!  Must of been the testosterone supplements getting into the lake. 

hawkeypucks
hawkeypucks

@ReallyLaLa1 that is an interesting article, thanks for passing it along!

ColleBernie
ColleBernie

@OurOcean @TIME 'tipsy fish' huh? Shouldn't be drinking!

WasteTimeAndGet
WasteTimeAndGet

All that rogaine washing down the drain will mean no more bald eagles.

mikehaggag
mikehaggag

My fish was suicidal after ingesting so much anti-depressants, jumped out of the tank, right into my cat's mouth. My cat was high on stimulants, spit the fish out, tossed it around for half an hour, before swallowing it whole.

lilbritchesmom
lilbritchesmom

For everyone who is looking for a way to dispose of your old prescriptions, call your fire department, a lot of times communities will have hazmat disposal an a regular basis. Hope this helps. p.s. call the non-emergency line. ;-)

LB35
LB35

to verslalchimie:

I suggest putting old drugs into the garbage. Hide it to make sure nobody sees it there. Someone suggested mixing the pills with used coffee grounds. Modern landfills are designed to prevent anything from leaching into the ground water, so this would be a responcible solution.

Chewy1635
Chewy1635

@HandmadeDiva @time same way it always has, dummy.

thefishspeaks
thefishspeaks

@JohnnyVegas11 def gonna be a tipsyfish tomorrow #PresidentsDayBarCrawl

FredSmith1
FredSmith1

@LB35 That would mean people would have to urinate and defecate into the garbage to keep these drugs out of the water supply.

Apalma1984
Apalma1984

@thefishspeaks I think having @johnnyvegas11 make an appearance would be the move for tomorrow's festivities #PresidentsDayBarCrawl

LB35
LB35

I don't suggest doing that. I was referrring to another person's comment about trying to dispose of old medicine some other way than pouring it down the drain. We can at least minimize what goes into the rivers by diverting unused drugs.

JohnnyVegas11
JohnnyVegas11

@Apalma1984 @thefishspeaks I'd have to pass on that bro's...I don't vote for em, I will not crawl for em.

US1776
US1776

@LB35 That will not work.  It just slightly delays the inevitable.  All the landfills eventually leech into the water table.

The only true solution is very high temp incineration.  This breaks down all the compounds into their basic elements.