Mutant Cockroaches Have Learned to Evade Sugar Traps

And it may be our fault

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Suburbanites may be blissfully unaware, but for city dwellers it’s one of nature’s ultimate truths: cockroaches love sweets. Sure, the repulsive, disease-carrying insects eat anything at all, from moldy cat food to the stinkiest cheese — but given a choice, they’ll always go for the sugar.

Or rather, they used to. According to a new study in Science, some roaches’ tastes are evolving to the point where they’re refusing to gobble down glucose, a form of sugar commonly found in plants. “They now perceive glucose as bitter,” says Coby Schal, an entomologist at North Carolina State University and one of the report’s authors. And while that might sound like good news for the roach-infested, it’s not: sucrose is the key attractant used in roach traps — and many of the nasty little creatures are no longer interested.

How did this happen? Turns out it may be our fault.

When prehistoric roaches lived in the wild, experts have theorized, it made sense to be glucose-averse — that mutation helped them avoid glucosides, or toxic glucose-containing molecules found in certain plants. “They’re nasty substances,” says Schal.

(PHOTOS: Portraits of the Insects Among Us)

But when cockroaches joined us in caves, and ultimately in homes — away from the threat of glucosides — “they would have lost this trait, because it became maladaptive,” says Schal. Regular sugar, after all, is a highly concentrated source of energy, and if roaches were wired to avoid it, their odds of survival would drop. “If you brought them a Krispy Kreme donut,” Schal explains, “they couldn’t eat it.”

The mutation remained in the genome, though. And when humans began putting glucose in roach poison, we reactivated it — so much so that when some roaches now taste sugar, Schal says, “they jump back as though you’ve given them an electric shock.”

So goes the theory, anyway. A true test will have to wait until molecular biologists decode the cockroach genome and look at the changes that might have taken place in roach DNA over recent decades. “We have roaches in the freezer that date back to the 1930s,” says Schal. “This is what’s going to be driving our research over the next five or 10 years.”

But all hope of trapping these mutant critters is not lost. Sucrose-averse roaches are still attracted to fructose, or fruit sugar, and maltose, which is found in beer (“They really love that stuff,” says Schal). So the proprietors of the Roach Motel need only switch flavors to stay in business.

MORE: Cockroaches, Sponges and Snakes: The Top 10 New Species

60 comments
basiliskbreath
basiliskbreath

They learned how to do this a long time ago, really. You guys are super behind.

juronselor
juronselor

@ervin_DC yan ata yung sa bote, yung kapag may tirang coke for example, pag pumasok yung ipis diba di na makakalabas hehe

uncoveror
uncoveror

I suggest putting high fructose corn syrup in roach traps instead of our food supply.

TrimZimm
TrimZimm

TGhat looks like its gonna be good. Wow.


www.GetYourAnon.tk

Roulon
Roulon

@BiancaMarais terrific. Seems I should smear Pritt on the floor and then sprinkle beer and it will still stop them. For now.

MikeLand
MikeLand

Boric Acid.  Still works to break the reproductive cycle.  How long? We may not know.

Schaus1
Schaus1

Maybe it's because they know the sugar is genetically modified and unlike most of us humans, they know genetically modified foods destroy the organs.

AMazarello
AMazarello

@RiaShah48 Haha, I was going to quote tweet this to you as well. Told you they're a threat. Hope you're all clued up with maths now as well!

USS_Vasquez
USS_Vasquez

@TIME Dont tell me the film The Nest (1988) is going to become a reality!

KountyKobbler
KountyKobbler

@TIME it is purely logical.. kill off all the roaches that are attracted to that then the ones left are immune just like virus they learn

JordyHuk
JordyHuk

@tayg14 ......great? No. Nope. Not good. We have traps. And there was A ROACH IN OUR HOUSE TODAY. It wasn't great. :(

loveabbyshow
loveabbyshow

@TIME Insulted by slanderous article, [Sure, the repulsive, disease-carrying insects eat anything at all] roaches reply: "we hate quinoa."

Helloovee
Helloovee

@TIME Lmfao I guess they have some level of intelligence.

conciseness
conciseness

@TIME "Survival of the fit only the strong survive." -Mobb Deep

ecoliere
ecoliere

@tag_traumer I did research b4. you gotta learn abt your enemy bb..I knew May is their MAKING LOVE MONTH and tho I love May babies, not them

thanr
thanr

@tri26 lol, my fondest memories of roaches yep

Hadrewsky
Hadrewsky

@Schaus1 

Yes because you eco pigs are experts in genetics as you are deluded.

tayg14
tayg14

@JordyHuk oh my great was meant as sarcasm! I hate them! Nasty little creatures!